Friday, January 30, 2009

After the Ice



Because I've been reading so much about brain function and especially about the neurology of consciousness, I'm aware that what we perceive has as much to do with our expectations and values as with the sensory information that enters our brains. We perceive what we expect to, what we think is important, and we judge our perceptions based on personal values.

I think this is why our new president was so shocked by the school closures during our mini-Ice Age this week.

My dear darling Barack:

Yes you lived in Chicago for a long time and you loved it there, and yes it's true, in Chicago they don't close schools during ice storms. But. This is NOT Chicago, even though that's what your consciousness tells you to expect.

Don't worry about Washingtonian toughness, dear Mr. President. We don't like ice because we live in the south, but we are tough, way tough, just in a different way than Chicagoans. You'll see.

Love,
Your friend and supporter Reya.


As a naturalized Washingtonian, I for one am happy to see blue skies and sunshine again, and am so happy that the ice is melting, making streets and pavements once more negotiable. The birds, too, seem very happy this morning. Spring truly is right around the corner. Oh yeah!

26 comments:

Shorty said...

Great post, and I absolutely adore the picture with the antique sewing machines!

Sanctified Spaces said...

Thats a nice picture

The C-Suite Executive Assistant said...

The store window pix are fantastic. Have you ever thought of publishing a book on "Store windows"? I think it would make a great coffee table book!

Peggy said...

The ice photo is terrific, Reya! Just one of the forms lowly water can take, but it can paralyze and hold in suspended animation our lives and livelihoods! Living in West Michigan, I consider myself a hearty Winter soul, but I don't mess around with ice. I hate the way it muscles its way in and hold your town hostage!

A Cuban In London said...

I loved your explanation on perception and expectation, a phenomenon I have been lured by for a long time. Many thanks.

Greetings from London.

Lizzy Frizzfrock said...

Yes, that is the way of the south... a little ice & schools & businesses shut down. We may be tough in some matters, but we don't mess with ICE.

As always, your photos are great. The sewing machine photo is unique. I've been meaning to ask what camera you use. Do you mind sharing?

It's a crisp, sunny day in central Texas too. Have a good weekend!

Cheryl

deborah said...

great photos
great note to our president
the sewing machine looks like Grandma Grace's

love you so much!

JOY said...

The ice picture is stunning. You should do a book of your pictures. They are something I would love to look at again and again.

Reya Mellicker said...

Thanks!

I use a Nikon Coolpix camera - point and shoot. It was cheap, less than $200. I do sharpen the contrast and correct the color on photoshop. But most of what makes my pictures fun to look at is the fact that I live in a beautiful city.

But thanks so much, every one of you.

Cuban in London? I need to catch up with you!

lacochran said...

Spring may be coming but I'm betting on more snow first. :)

mouse (aka kimy) said...

it is also important to have the right equipment when confronted with ice and snow.... which I think is why places like cleveland and chicago can handle the stuff, but places in the south like dc don't.....

nice sewing machine...speaking of which lunch is over back to mine!

Kim said...

Reya I adore the picture of the ice and bricks it is very compelling. In Texas this week everywhere around where I live had school delays. Coming from Wyoming it highly entertains me. But the way I see it, the more people staying home the less likely you are to collide with someone. Thank you for your insight!

Mrsupole said...

Great pictures!

It looked like the ice had frozen a brick to your heart and is just waiting to break free to begin the joys of spring.

The other one just seems like a more peaceful time somehow.

It is funny you say you live in the South, I always thought that DC was part of the North, I guess living in So. Calif. that when I look on a map you just seem so high up there. My mom is from Chicago and she always says she is glad she never has to deal with the snow, wind, or ice anymore. But still just a little would be nice. God Bless.

Meri Arnett-Kremian said...

I'm so glad I found you via Kim at Mouse Medicine. I'm linking you to my blog so I can check on you and see what's new. Do you want people to link their poem posts back to you on February 2? I can hardly wait to post a poem that's been first-place since I read it about 30 years ago.

rothko said...

The thing is, DC also shuts down a lot when it gets too hot. I mean, you can't have it both ways, shutting down for ice and hotness. I mean, you know I love DC, but c'mon, that is just an intsy bit wimpy.

But now that I think about it, I don't really think the shut-downs have anything to do with toughness or wimpy-ness. I think Washingtonians just like an excuse to skip work and party. See ... one of the reasons I love it there.

janis said...

Bravo!
I think that President Obama would appreciate your posting. I hope he reads it.

Hilarywho said...

Great insights as usual & I especially love the pic of the Singer & doll in the shop window. Very nice!

Joanne said...

The doll with the sewing machine looks like she's enjoying the thawing sunshine. Guess we'll know Monday how soon Spring will arrive depending on the groundhog's decision!

Butternut Squash said...

Hi Reya,

I've been meaning to write about mental constructs and encounters with the super natural. I don't want to take up too much of your space here, but as I have traveled from country to country and asked about peoples ghostly experiences I find that all cultures have ghost stories but what they describe seeing is based on what their culture tells them they will see.

ArtSparker said...

Lovely photo. I have enduring memories of slipping on black ice and landing on my butt several times in one day when I was living in Chicago.

I have been thinking for some time about binary thinking - we need it for simple information sorting, but it has great limitations and does not contain the truth. I think there is confusion bout that, it's not unnatural to want either/or.

Barbara Martin said...

Great post, Reya. My mother owned a Singer sewing machine just like the one in the window: and I learned to sew on it for a Home Ec class in junior high school.

Ronda Laveen said...

Toughness is a "choice of standards." What is and what is not, tough comes from our experiences and expectations. And, although I have never been in DC, I believe that the definition of Washingtonian toughness will soon surface. The photo of the ice locks me in the stillness of the that moment of expectancy while the sewing subject photo brings my past back to me. I was a seamstress for many years and loved the orientation of this pic.

lettuce said...

so much of perception is to do with perspective i think

doesn't she look contented in her pretty dress by her sewing machine?

Sarah Laurence said...

Reya, cool photos! I love the reflection below especially and how you find beauty in even an icy sidewalk. We get a lot of ice/snow days in Maine. I have a grown up golden puppy too – she still acts like one at 4. I’m so glad Bee introduced me to your blog.

Reya Mellicker said...

The doll in the window looked peaceful to me, too. Afternoons of winter sunshine are so wonderful.

My grandmother had a sewing machine just like the one in the pic.

Ronda you were a seamstress? That is so cool.

Bee said...

I was reading an interesting article about how we tend to hang out with/and listen to the people who reinforce our own opinions and belief systems. I find that this happens even with blogging, because your blog constantly makes me think: Yes, that's it exactly!

I hope that Obama can break some Republican ice, though. This country doesn't need ideological gridlock.