Sunday, May 16, 2010

Chiaroscuro



Too much of anything is harmful, it is. Even too much divine light. We need the connection to the Divine, in some form or another. Without that unraveling energy we become fixed, heavy. Without divine light, we turn to stone or worse, we tumble into the dark.

But too much divine light causes problems, too. It makes people crazy, as can be seen by thinking about anyone who lives in the middle east. I believe there's something about the land currently known as Israel that attracts a whole lot of divine light, hence three pretty hefty religions originated there. It seems that people can visit and even live there awhile without going crazy, but leave our open, impressionable hearts in that area for too long and there's going to be trouble.

In some traditions, we humans wear little caps or fancy hats, scarves and other head coverings in order to remain slightly protected from divine light. In others, the crown of the head is shaved, or the entire head is shaved, perhaps so as to call in more light. You would have to be pretty grounded to go that route, I would think.

According to the cosmology of Reya, divine light dissolves everything: thoughts, ideas, emotions, matter and form. Praying feels to me like an unwinding, a loosening and a release of what keeps me bound most of the time. Unwinding is good, very good. After praying every morning I make coffee and breakfast, read the newspaper, do regular "real life" stuff like taking a shower, putting on clothes and such. By praying I unwind enough that I can begin again, as is characteristic of my species, to rewind; to build and shape and create my day.

I'm thinking about this because one of my clients has flown perhaps a bit too close to the sun (as it were) and is suffering from a divine light sunburn. She is exhausted and tender because of it, in need of a lot of cool, tender, loving aloe vera-like energy. Poor thing. She'll be OK, but right now ... ouch!

Happy Sunday!

16 comments:

Barbara said...

Interesting because yesterday's sermon at Temple Micah was all about the history of head coverings and even the practice of covering the Torah.

Reya Mellicker said...

Love it when I'm on a wavelength with Temple Micah!

Barbara said...

The Bat Mitzvah girl's question was why we cover our heads and whether God cares. Our rabbi Esther said her God doesn't care in the least, but we do it out of a need to prepare ourselves.

Mrsupole said...

Yes, they say too much light can drive a person crazy. But then again, they also say that not enough light can make a person depressed. Somehow there must be balance in the light and praying is what helps to bring that balance. I am sure that meditating also helps to bring someone balance. Being balanced and having balance must be very important to all of us. Thank you for pointing this out.

God bless.

Deborah said...

could you be more brilliant?
I think not.
could your photographs be more beautiful?
I think not.

Love and light and more love to you.

Nancy said...

Interesting idea about light.

Barbara said...

Such an interesting post. I'd love to hear more of your thoughts on this subject. I especially relate to your description of your experience with prayer.

Thanks for sharing.

Peace!

Ronda Laveen said...

Divine Light can be heady stuff. Getting drunk on it can leave one a little hung over. Sending aloed-energy.

Tom said...

been out in nature and in the garden a lot this weekend, getting dirty dirt under my fingernails...talk about a dose of energy...i think you're onto something here

Rick said...

Someone I know, and love, spoke to me recently about "the Tao of Goldilocks". It made a lot of sense.

much love to you

Jo Floyd Lucas said...

Ditto on what Deborah said. xx

Reya Mellicker said...

Tom I have come to think, more and more, that "earthy" pursuits, like gardening, cooking, cleaning and such do us a world of good, keep our feet on the ground. The monks who shave their heads do a whole lot of earthly chores every day. I bet it keeps them sane.

Barry said...

Divine light falls softly on the rugged bricks in your second photo. one of my favourites.

Val said...

the first european settlers in africa were advised to wear pith helmets and spine pads of red felt, to protect themselves from too much sunlight which could make them crazy...

Reya Mellicker said...

Val - wow!

Paul C said...

The interplay of light and shade...Perhaps the most divine light I have seen was in a Vancouver Island provincial park of virgin growth Douglas Fir, Western red cedar, five foot ferns...the canopy was very high, and here and there slivers of light came through... It's called a cathedral grove. Physical light, metaphorical light, spiritual light.