Saturday, October 18, 2008

Musical Chairs



Watching the Rajasthani musicians at the Sackler this morning as they enthusiastically invoked Ganesha, I was imagining that each of them must be firmly seated in their faith. Surely none of them sit around and wonder if Christianity might work better for them than Hinduism. Right?

I know plenty of Jews who are 100% Jewish, and Christians who feel very settled and proud to be exactly that. I know Pagans who long ago shrugged off whatever religion they were raised within. These people embrace their Paganism fully and enthusiastically; they never look back.

Maybe it's because I'm such a spiritual misfit that I sometimes envy those who have a serious grip on one, just ONE, religious path. Me? I'm a JewishTengriBuddhistMysticTaoistPaganSufiAgnostic. I even feel Christian, at least for Easter, a holiday I adore. Confusing? Yeah. I think so, too.

Am I a "well seated" JewishTengriBuddhistMysticTaoistPaganSufiAgnostic? How in the world could I be? My goodness.

In the realm of the spirit, I belong everywhere and nowhere. Usually that's OK with me, though some days I have a secret hankering for spiritual monogamy. I imagine that identifying with a specific religion would bestow me with a crystal clear head, a crystal clear heart.

It's a fantasy, isn't it, to think a well defined path would somehow be better for me? Isn't it? In my heart of hearts, God whispers Oh yeah!! Nice fantasy though.

In spite of my multiple spirituality disorder, I feel so well loved. Thanks God!



Invocations of Ganesha: Rupayan and Kalapriya
10:30 am each day
Freer steps and plaza (rain location, Sackler pavilion)
To inaugurate each day’s activities, Rajasthani dancers from the Kalapriya dance company of Chicago join musicians from the Rupayan ensemble of Jodhpur to invoke Ganesha, the deity who removes obstacles to all endeavors.

18 comments:

ArtSparker said...

And do we ever need Ganesha now - also the deity of prosperity, I believe. Jaya Ganesha. That pink sari is also very cheerful.

Lori ann said...

I like what the Dalai Lama has said, "My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness". And this, "All major religious traditions carry basically the same message, that is love, compassion and forgiveness the important thing is they should be part of our daily lives".
I think you are lucky reya to have such an open heart and mind.AND, you get to have all those extra days of celebration!
xx lori

Lori ann said...

oh! i forgot to say i LOVe the dancer, thank you for sharing this.

Miranda said...

I think a mix of religions is the way to go. One of the street kids I work with is Muslim and Christian...Mosque on Friday, Church on Sunday

Miranda said...

Oh and I love what Lori says about Kindness. So bloody true

Reya Mellicker said...

This morning I woke up thinking about gardens (one of the major themes of the exhibit) and how gardens contain a variety of plants. Even the plants that wither and die off serve as compost.

It was just a moment of envy I had yesterday. I do envy the Dalai Lama, having such a simple sense of his religion.

My own religion is intensely complex. Why not?

Angela said...

I agree with Lori. The simpler and kinder a religion is, the better. But if you like it complicated, why not. Don`t forget to include the self-love, though! That is in Christianity, and I think it is vital! Love thy neighbour as THYSELF! I hope you do that, Reya. We all do.

tut-tut said...

Oh Reya; just thinking along those lines. Complexity has its place, just as simplicity does.

Pam said...

Yes, I could have written that Reya. I know exactly what you mean.Made me smile to recognize a like-mind, and the visual at the end of the post is wonderful, very pretty and uplifting.

Ernest de Cugnac said...

religion. don't really feel it or trust it. but strangely, i like religious people. beautiful photos as always you clever thing.

lucy said...

beautiful dancer photos.

have you seen the documentary "latcho drom"? all about the rom people, who originally came from rajasthan...i think they journeyed through many religions too.

my aunt mary, at 90, said she celebrated everybody's holidays. much to be said for being ecumenical, especially if you think spirit manifests in infinite ways.

i'm sorry to hear you'd been ill, i haven't read in a few weeks. hope you are rinsed of that, and on to a more joyful path.

Val said...

hey Reya, I do think its better to think for yourself and follow your own path even if it is lonely and confusing at times - without a group to discuss thoughts and ideas with or give guidance (apart from your blogger pals of course :-). I dont like the way established religeons use their influence over minds and hearts to promote political power; I love the religeon of kindness, and the pink sari though..xx

Lynne said...

I think you take the best all those religions have to offer and roll them all into one that works for you. And why not? Why have just one? I don't really have any of that, so I am envious.

Love the top photo. Perfectly ready to frame! And the dancer ... loved it!

Steve said...

I think complexity is somewhat in the eye of the beholder. Your religion could be seen as very simple, an amalgam of all those traditions that suits you perfectly. Think of it as a united whole, in other words, rather than a bunch of different parts.

mouse (aka kimy) said...

I want to visit the freer! thank you for the beautiful slide show!

and I love the top pic too....

Reya Mellicker said...

Thank you Steve. You're so wise!

Barbara Martin said...

The few times I have experienced brief soft messages from angels sometimes begin or end with "child of God". Once I asked about the people of Earth, and the reply I received was "they are all children of God".

So, Reya, feel free to be whatever you want. Everyone is loved.

lettuce said...

great pictures reya, as always. she's so beautiful!

i don't know about spiritual monogamy... any form of any religion seems pretty complex to me, in some ways - there are always levels and links to other faiths, aren't there?