Saturday, March 14, 2009

Gray



The weather gods are feeling mighty dull. It's chilly and damp here at sea level in the midatlantic. Overhead is a dark, thick, gray overcast that feels energetically like peanut butter or some other heavy sticky mass. I, for one, feel burdened by the peanut butter sky.

How cool that the trees and daffodils are undaunted by all the bitter gray. It is time for them to unfold, and so they will, even if it feels like midwinter to we humans.

The first tree to come fully into bloom on this side of Capitol Hill is always the one on the north side of Constitution between 8th and 9th Streets. That one particular tree jumps in before all the others. Every year I wonder why. There are other trees up and down that block that wait to bloom until later, so it can't be the soil. There's no sunlight coaxing the tree this week, so it can't be about that. Maybe it's just the disposition of that particular tree to bloom early. Who knows?

It's a cheerful sight, the pink puffs underneath the gray sky, a beacon of spring in the midst of this meterological blah-ness. Thanks Mr. Tree!

22 comments:

The Family Julz said...

We're having the same heavy weather here. I'm thinking some jasmine green tea from the local coffee shop will make the blooms surely around somewhere jump out at my eyes. I hope.

Maybe that tree is sitting directly on/next to a Ley line?

Lisa said...

wea re moving on into Autumn here and the last of the 'stinking hot' weather seems to be behind us.

Its midnight and raining now- bliss, bliss, bliss xx

Wildeve said...

How beautiful! Good photo weather, anyway. I love your image of the peanut butter sky. Today we are blessed with sun for a change, a welcome relief.

Reya Mellicker said...

Julz! Wow!! Maybe that's it. Thank you, I would not have thought of it, but I bet you're right.

Evening Light Writer said...

Grey and dull here with a chance of rain at 100% ! If that isn't daunting then I don't know what! Our high for today is 43 degrees. But I see a cardinal popping on and off of the fence..such bright colors! That photo of the tree brightens my spirits immensely.

janis said...

That tree is so beautiful! I like that you can see the sweet little busy bee on one of the blossoms.

John Hayes said...

The gray wall is an amazing shot.. I do think about the "on-off" process of plant life myself; the sort of "consciousness" of now it's time to bud, now it's time to become dormant.

Love the term "peanut-butter sky."

Butternut Squash said...

I was down on Connecticut Ave. on Thursday visiting a customer. It was 20 degrees warmer in DC than central PA where we are. Nothing is blossoming here yet. I don't mind a gray Saturday morning so much. It keeps the donkeys quiet so that we can sleep in a little longer.

rothko said...

I've noticed that in our neighborhood the trees bloom and go dormant at very different times. For instance, this fall the tree in our front yard dropped it's leaves a good month or so after most of the other ones. I like to think it's because he's a fighter.

A Cuban In London said...

I must admit that you got me with the first words of this post. Being a fan of dark grey myself, I welcome spring because of the contrast it presents. Revival follows the death signified by autumn (my favourite season) and winter. Excellent images (I love that wall) and good write-up. Many thanks.

Greetings from London.

Larry said...

Greetings from Hannibal, MO, Reya!

It's still pre-spring gray here. No flowering trees yet (or daffodils), but some crocuses have popped up.

Everyone here is itching for spring. It's a bit tantalizing to read reports of more southern climes!

willow said...

Lots of thick, heavy grey over here, too. Looking forward to the crabapple blooms. We have a few huge old trees left, but the deer gobbled up the three new trees we planted last year!

The Family Julz said...

OH wild lavender and OH the fascinating works of the brain, whether you know it or not you still very much a High Priestess.

The Family Julz said...

AND! if it is a Ley Line. What an incredibly powerful, memory laden stroke of energy it must be.

Reya Mellicker said...

Janis - I've been happy to see LOTS of bees this season, more than I've seen in years. Maybe that awful disease that ripped through their community has passed and their numbers will increase.

Butternut - I love your life! By all means, let the donkeys sleep in. Hey if you're in DC, please let me know if you'd like to sit down together for coffee. I would love to meet you in person.

Reya Mellicker said...

Larry I grew up in Kansas City. Very cool to "see" someone from Missouri.

Do you have a blog?

Larry said...

I've been blogging for four years from here in Missouri. The URL is:

http://www.silphium.net/blog

Nice to meet you too!

Bee said...

A leaden sky can really dampen my spirits too, Reya.

The "mystery" of the early blooming tree intrigues me. Similarly, I planted a bunch of raspberry canes in November and JUST ONE has some green growth on it. I guess that plants, like people, have early bloomers.

tam said...

a trend setting tree! How cool.

Delwyn said...

I often wonder that too with poinciana trees flowering here between Nov and Feb ...Maybe its natures way of sharing the joy

Ronda Laveen said...

I like PB but not on my sky. I like Julz Ley line theory.

Steve said...

"Peanut butter sky" -- great description!

It is mysterious how some trees come to life before others, and not always because of a difference in species. I think some of them are just early risers -- just like some people!